Terra Europae – Earthen Architecture in the European Union

Wow – that was quick! Today my copy of Terra Europae – Earthen Architecture in the European Unionarrived.

This book is the result of the Terra [In]cognita research project developed between 2009 and 2011 by Ecole d’Avignon (France), Escola Superior Gallaecia (Portugal), Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain), Università degli Studi di Firenze (Italy) and CAUE-Conseil d’Architecture, d’Urbanisme et de l’Environnement of Vaucluse (France). European partners in the Culture 2007-2013 programme.

The volume is a celebration of earth building in Europe – looking at heritage buildings and contemporary earth buildings – it is inspirational and quite overwhelming to see a building material expressed throughout Europe and with some really interesting, new examples to look through. Particularly loving the earth buildings in Estonia as I write this post.

Copertina

I was given the task of providing a very concise summary of earth building in the UK – such a short summary can hardly so justice for such a complex and varied building material – but I hope that it at least covers the basics.

The conference in Marseilles in late May was interesting and I was chuffed that the ‘award for outstanding European Earthen Architecture’ was awarded to WISE at CAT and to Logie Schoolhouse.

Further information is on the publishers website:

http://www.edizioniets.com/Scheda.asp?N=9788846729576

My contribution is

Chabenet, M, Cooke, L and O’Reilly, B. 2011. Earthen architecture in Northwestern Europe: Ireland, the United Kingdom and Northern France. In. Terra Europae – Earthen Architecture in the European Union. Pisa, Italy: Edizioni ETS. p. 48-63.

Cooke, L. 2011. Earthen architecture in the United Kingdom. In. Terra Europae – Earthen Architecture in the European Union. Pisa, Italy: Edizioni ETS. p. 188-191.

Dr Louise Cooke 25/11/2011

About Louise Cooke

Louise Cooke - landscapes, archaeology, earth buildings and other interesting things
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